Monthly Archives: February 2016

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—Luke 13:1–5

“Now on the same occasion there were some present who reported to Him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mixed with their sacrifices. And Jesus said to them, ‘Do you suppose that these Galileans were greater sinners than all other Galileans because they suffered this fate? I tell you, no, but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish. Or do you suppose that those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them were worse culprits than all the men who live in Jerusalem? I tell you, no, but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.’” (Luke 13:1–5, NASB).

I usually try to avoid writing or posting about a Bible passage shortly after hearing someone else preach about it. However, during the Scripture reading this morning, something grabbed my attention, and the pastor did not really address it. So, I will deviate from my rule this time.

This passage appears in an extended series of teachings that Jesus is giving to the crowds who are following Him. During His teaching, someone told Him about an incident where Pontius Pilate had apparently had some Galileans killed while they were offering sacrifices at the temple. It is not clear whether this is the first time Jesus heard about this or not. What is important is the way Jesus confronted a common view of human suffering.

The people of Jesus’ day viewed suffering as a sure sign of divine justice or judgement. If a Roman official could have you killed while you are worshipping God, you must have deserved it; if you were innocent, God would protect you. Likewise, if a tower fell upon you and killed you, then you got what you deserved. By this logic, everybody who died on 9/11 must be in hell.

Although I believe strongly in divine justice, this view is simplistic, erroneous, and evil. God is just, but this life is not always fair. We will see divine justice finalized in the next life, even though a lot of evil goes unpunished in this world and a lot of good does not see its reward. (I add that this is part of the reason that I find universalism—the belief that all people will be saved and nobody goes to hell—to be an absolutely heretical false teaching, completely incompatible with the Christian faith.)

Jesus simply does not allow His hearers to ponder the fate of others. He turns the question back on those who are present. He confronts us as well.

It should not matter to us so much what God is doing about other people. Yes, they are sinners who are doomed if they do not receive forgiveness. But, so are we. Every one of us has sinned and fall short of the glory of God. If we have not repented, or do not repent, we will give a reckoning to Him on the day of judgement. Maybe my sins are not as blatant or scandalous as those of some politicians, serial killers, terrorists, or morally reprobate celebrities. Still, I do not need to worry about what God will do to the Kardashians. I need to make sure that I am doing His will and allowing Him to work through me.

Which brings me to the other point: How should we react when we see evil or disaster? Should we rejoice when a sinner “gets what he deserves”? Should we rejoice that God finally did something our way when natural disaster devastates a region and kills many people?

It is not our job to judge: When disaster or tragedy strikes, our job is not to analyze, but to minister in Christ’s place. In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of the east coast, especially Long Island. Some may have asked if this was God’s judgement upon the liberal northeast. Maybe it was, but it was not my job to proclaim God’s wrath. At that time, real Christians (along with other people of good will) were donating clothing and money to help those who had lost possessions; they were donating time to help people clean out their flooded homes; they were inviting homeless or displaced friends and relatives to stay in their homes. They were manifesting the love of God.

Let us always keep our eyes on God’s will for our own lives, seeking to minister to the victims when life is not fair, and to repent of the sins that infect our own souls.

This post was written as part of the Scripture Sabbath Challenge

.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Advertisements
Categories: Bible meditations, Character and Values, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—First Corinthians 2:14–16

“But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised. But he who is spiritual appraises all things, yet he himself is appraised by no one. For who has known the mind of the Lord, that he will instruct Him? But we have the mind of Christ” (1 Corinthians 2:14-16, NASB).

In recent years, members of Westboro Baptist Church generated a lot of controversy by protesting in various places (including military funerals), claiming that “God hates fags” and that His wrath is upon our nation for accepting homosexuality.

I have to object to this method of ministry outreach. For one thing, while the Bible teaches that God hates sin, it also teaches us that He is love. Thus, while God may hate different forms of sexual immorality, He loves the people who are bound or deceived by those sins and wants to forgive, heal, and restore them.

Second, even if the tone of the message was appropriate (if they were lovingly speaking against the sin without claiming that God shared their hatred of other people), it would still be the wrong message. The biblical mandate for ministry to the lost has not changed, even if society has:

“And Jesus came up and spoke to them, saying, ‘All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth. Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age'” (Matthew 28:18–20, NASB).

God has called us to make disciples of all nations. Our first task is to invite people into a relationship with Christ. That is our starting point. There is only so much a person can truly understand about the Gospel before the Holy Spirit takes up residence in their heart.

First Corinthians 2:14–16 reminds us that the natural man cannot understand the things of the Spirit of God. They sound like foolishness to non-believers. Yet, all too often, Christians begin by trying to explain secondary issues to those around them. Those things will seem illogical if the Holy Spirit is not giving wisdom to the listener.

Try to explain biblical sexual morality to someone who does not accept Jesus Christ’s authority as King of Kings and Lord of Lords. It does not work; the secular world’s system of values seems completely logical to an atheist, agnostic, or anybody else who does not accept the personal God of the Bible. The same is true for the creationism/evolution debate and countless other areas where Christians and the secular world find controversy.  The reality and authority of Jesus Christ establish the entire foundation for the believer’s worldview.

As we minister to a lost world, and as our society drifts further from its Judeo-Christian foundations, we need to remember to keep the focus on Jesus. People need to see, trust, and know Him before they can really be expected to make sense of the “things of the Spirit of God.” A note on 1 Corinthians 2:14–15 from The Life Recovery Bible sums this up very well:

People who refuse to turn their life over to the care of God cannot understand God’s truth or his plan. That’s why recovery begins not with understanding but with a decision to follow God. Prior to that decision, God’s way may seem like madness. Only when we face the fact that our life is insane can we open ourself to God and his plan for us. [Life Recovery Bible, New Living Translation, 2nd ed. (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2007), p. 1458].

May we always remember to begin with a relationship with Jesus Christ, guided by the wisdom of the Holy Spirit, so that we may understand and proclaim the full truth of God’s Word.

This post was written as part of the Scripture Sabbath Challenge

.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Pro-Life Movement after Antonin Scalia’s Death

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia 1936-2016

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia,
1936-2016

The death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia last week is a major blow to conservatism in the United States government. Scalia was considered one of the court’s two most conservative justices (along with Clarence Thomas). Scalia and Thomas were unapologetically conservative on social and moral issues like abortion and marriage. With Scalia’s death, I believe Thomas is the only truly committed pro-life justice on the court.

His demise will have a significant impact on several high-profile cases this year. It is significant enough that some commentators consider it almost a deadly blow for political conservatism. I have even read a few comments online and in social media suggesting that the Constitution died with him.

I believe our problems as a nation are deeper than that. If the fate of our nation rested so heavily on the shoulders of one unelected official, we truly are in trouble.

The real problem is the idolatry of politics that many Americans, and particularly many Christians, have adopted. Many worship at the altar of the state and pray to “deities” named Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, and Marco Rubio. (I am not suggesting that any or all of these men consider themselves divine; just that many of their supporters place a level of faith in them that should be reserved for God. Also, since I write from a rather conservative perspective, I doubt many worshippers of Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, or Bernie Sanders are reading this.) While I pray that voters will elect men and women with integrity, who will honor our nation’s Judeo-Christian heritage and biblical values, I do not believe this will heal our land.

Now as always, if not more than ever, Christians need to get our priorities in order: “[If] My people who are called by My name humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, will forgive their sin and will heal their land” (2 Chronicles 7:14, NASB).

While we should seek political leaders who will establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty, we cannot expect them to do the work that only God can do. We cannot give them the loyalty and trust that only God deserves.

Our nation is not drifting from God because Antonin Scalia died, and his death by itself does not create a moral and ideological crisis for our nation. Our nation suffers because God’s people do not recognize Him as King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

I will end this post with Psalm 2 (NASB), which reminds us that God is still the King, even if earthly rulers refuse to acknowledge Him:

Why are the nations in an uproar
And the peoples devising a vain thing?
The kings of the earth take their stand
And the rulers take counsel together
Against the Lord and against His Anointed, saying,
“Let us tear their fetters apart
And cast away their cords from us!”

He who sits in the heavens laughs,
The Lord scoffs at them.
Then He will speak to them in His anger
And terrify them in His fury, saying,
“But as for Me, I have installed My King
Upon Zion, My holy mountain.”

“I will surely tell of the decree of the Lord:
He said to Me, ‘You are My Son,
Today I have begotten You.
‘Ask of Me, and I will surely give the nations as Your inheritance,
And the very ends of the earth as Your possession.
‘You shall break them with a rod of iron,
You shall shatter them like earthenware.’”

Now therefore, O kings, show discernment;
Take warning, O judges of the earth.
Worship the Lord with reverence
And rejoice with trembling.
Do homage to the Son, that He not become angry, and you perish in the way,
For His wrath may soon be kindled.
How blessed are all who take refuge in Him!

Categories: Current events, Politics | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—James 1:26–27

“If anyone thinks himself to be religious, and yet does not bridle his tongue but deceives his own heart, this man’s religion is worthless. Pure and undefiled religion in the sight of our God and Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their distress, and to keep oneself unstained by the world” (James 1:26–27, NASB).

Beginning Lent, I am reminded that the traditions, rituals, and liturgy of the Church are valuable only to the extent that they bring us closer to Jesus. The best way to know whether we are close to Jesus is to measure how much we are reflecting His love to the world.

I have found that there are, essentially, four kinds of Christians.  One kind prays only for themselves and makes no pretext that they care about the needs of others. The second group will say they will pray for you, but they probably will not. The third group will pray for you. The fourth group will seek to be God’s answer to your prayers.

The passage above does not tell us that “pure and undefiled” religion is praying for widows and orphans, but rather actually visiting them. It is easy to pray for for those who are hurting. It is a lot harder to join them in their pain, to become the first pair of ears all week to listen to their sorrows. It is not easy to help them.

This should be the challenge of Lent. Prayer and fasting are wonderful things. They can bring us closer to Christ. However, if they have accomplished that goal, you will go beyond prayer and fasting to active spiritual service.

We see this throughout Scripture. In the first chapter of Isaiah, God says through the prophet, “‘What are your multiplied sacrifices to Me?’ Says the LORD. ‘I have had enough of burnt offerings of rams And the fat of fed cattle; And I take no pleasure in the blood of bulls, lambs or goats'” (Isaiah 1:11). He calls  their sacrifices—many of which were commanded in the Torah—”worthless” and “abominations.” Instead, what is the “fast” that He desires? “Wash yourselves, make yourselves clean; Remove the evil of your deeds from My sight. Cease to do evil, Learn to do good; Seek justice, Reprove the ruthless, Defend the orphan, Plead for the widow” (Isaiah 1:16–17).

It is easy to pray for the downtrodden, and to hope that somebody else will minister to them. But, God is calling each of us to a mission field. It is not enough to pray for the orphans and widows. Each of us must reach out to them.

Placing it in a more contemporary environment, it is not enough for us to pray for the salvation of “those people” from the wrong side of the tracks. We are called to share the love and mercy of Jesus directly with them.

As I was reflecting on this week’s post, I heard the song, “Jesus is a Friend of Mine,” by Aaron Neville. His testimony is amazing: His lengthy music career was interrupted by struggles with drug addiction (including a few prison sentences) before he found deliverance through his faith in Christ. A few thoughts come to me as I listen to this song: remember that God has saved me from sin; remember that “those people” need to hear that same message of grace that saved me; and remember to reach out to them with the love of God. You can find that song at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rN05ClD3vA.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Character and Values, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lent: A Time of Renewal

(This is a slightly updated version of post that I originally wrote in 2011.)

5513951183_568ea496ed1

Ash Wednesday, which falls on February 10 this year, begins the season of the church calendar known as Lent. Many Christians think of Lent as a time of fasting. We may give up a favorite food or hobby. In some churches, people give up eating meat on Fridays during Lent (some churches urge their members to give up meat on Wednesdays as well at this time). However, Lent is not just about fasting. It should not be a season for meaningless ritualized self-denial, but a time when we renew our dedication to Christ. This is a prime time for strengthening our devotion to Christ so that we can walk with him throughout the year.

In the early church, the 40 hours preceding dawn on Easter Sunday were set aside for fasting, to commemorate Jesus’ time in the tomb. This eventually led to the 40-day fast that we now know as Lent. This time period is associated with Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness, when he fasted for 40 days and 40 nights (Matthew 4:2).

In most Western churches (including the Roman Catholic Church and Protestant churches that observe Lent), the 40 days include only weekdays and Saturdays. Sundays are always considered “feast days” (in celebration of Christ’s resurrection), so fasting is not required on those days.

In the early church, new converts were usually baptized on Easter. Lent served as a time to prepare for baptism, and the Lenten fast was a significant part of that preparation. For mature believers, it is a good opportunity to renew our baptismal vows or reflect on the significance of our new life in Christ. So, even though Lent call us to reflect on our sinfulness, mortality, and need for a Savior, it should also remind us of our new life in Christ and the ways that we are being transformed from glory to glory.

Many Christians receive ashes, in the shape of a cross, on their foreheads on Ash Wednesday. This reminds us that we are created from the dust of the earth, and that we will return to dust, since “the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23). Ash Wednesday reminds us that we needed a Savior to take away the penalty for our sins. Lent reminds us to deny ourselves and take up our cross if we wish to follow Jesus (Matthew 16:34).

It is true that Lent can become a meaningless ritual for some people. Many people give up things that are not important to them. They may give up a food that they enjoy but will probably not miss. For example, I like potato chips…when they are around. However, since I do not buy them too often, I might go weeks without eating any. This would not be a real Lenten fast for me. That might not be as silly as giving up something you do not even like, but it still would not be a genuine fast. There should be some significant sacrifice involved.

On the other hand, we must be careful about legalism in this regard. Observing Lent does not save us, nor does it automatically make someone a better Christian. Although Lent can be a powerful way to seek personal revival and renewal in our walk with the Lord, it is by no means the only way. A Christian who goes on a radical fast during Lent, but neglects his relationship with Christ the rest of the year, is not going to achieve spiritual maturity. Lent is a great time to seek a closer relationship with the Lord, but we must continue to seek that relationship after Easter and throughout the year.

The following are a few suggestions for a meaningful Lent:

First, make your Lenten fast meaningful. Give up a food or activity that will be a real sacrifice. I drink a lot of coffee, so on several occasions I gave that up during Lent. A couch potato might give up watching television for 40 days. Perhaps it will become a permanent lifestyle change. That is not the main goal, though. The goal is to give something up so that we can follow Christ more closely. Ideally, the time that would be spent engaging in a favorite activity can be redirected towards prayer, Bible study, worship, or some other way of drawing closer to Christ.

A helpful Scripture verse in this regard is Hebrews 12:1-2: “Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and the sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God” (ESV, emphasis added).

Note that this passage calls us to lay aside both weights and sin. These are two different things. Christians should always be ready to lay aside a sin. If it is a sin (disobedience to a clear command of God, especially spelled out in his Word), we should give it up immediately and permanently. That is not a fast; that is repentance. We should not wait until Ash Wednesday and start again after Easter. However, some things might be a weight on our walk with the Lord, even if they are not necessarily sinful. Many people watch too much television. The nature of the programs may not be bad. They may not be watching vulgar or ungodly programming. But, they might be watching too much television. Television might start to take priority over God and family for them. It weighs down their soul and enchains their time. If you have a weight on your relationship with him, maybe Lent would be a good time to see if you can live without that weight, and to find out what your life would be like if you spent that time serving Christ.

If you choose to fast from a particular food, choose something that will be a realistic sacrifice. OK, maybe you know you will fail if you try to give up coffee for Lent. Maybe chocolate or donuts are more realistic goals for you.

If you are healthy enough, maybe you can consider a more strict fast. Perhaps you may decide to abstain from all solid food for a 24-hour period. Or, you can consider giving up eating anything between breakfast and dinner once or twice per week. One option is a “Daniel fast,” named after the prophet Daniel in the Old Testament. This fast involves abstaining from all animal products (no meat or dairy) and sweets, and drinking only water.

I would advise against going on a strict 40-day absolute fast without food. Jesus, Moses, and Elijah went on such fasts, but those were unique circumstances. Most of us are not preparing to die for the sins of humanity or begin writing the Bible. Unless you have received a clear word from the Lord that you should go on such a fast, do not do it. Even if you do receive such a word, seek counsel from a mature Christian leader (a pastor, or another mature believer who will have the wisdom to tell you whether or not you are hearing from God) and a health care practitioner.

Lent should not be just a time to give something up. During your fast, find ways to add spiritual disciplines or activities to your life. If you have never set aside a consistent time for daily prayer, Lent is an excellent time to begin. It would also be a good time to join a small-group Bible study.

During the Lenten fast, devote some time to self-examination and reflection. Pray that the Lord would point out to you areas where you need to grow. If he brings a certain sin to the surface (including either a sinful habitual activity, a bad habit, or an attitude that displeases him), bring it before him in repentance and confession. Seek God’s guidance and help to find victory over and deliverance from this problem area.

Whatever you do, remember that Lent is only a small fraction of the year, and it is not the sum total of your spiritual growth. Allow Lent to be a time to develop new, healthier habits and activities which will produce growth in your faith, and continue to put them into practice throughout the year. Let Lent be a time of new beginnings for you.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Christian Life | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—2 Corinthians 3:18

But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as from the Lord, the Spirit” (2 Corinthians 3:18, NASB).

Over the next month and a half, much of my Scripture reading and prayer will address issues of transformation, renewal, and spiritual growth. Lent provides a time for such self-reflection: a time when I can look at my life and see where I fall short in my relationship with Jesus Christ, and renew my commitment to serving Him. I realize that Christians can (and should) do this throughout the year, whenever the Holy Spirit convicts them of that need. Yet, it is encouraging to know that many of my brothers and sisters in Christ regularly join in this journey at this time of year. I am not alone.

The verse above provides encouragement for those who proceed through Lent. Many are tempted to view any time of repentance or self-examination as an opportunity to condemn themselves and think about how evil they are. Many view such personal moral/spiritual inventories as opportunities to beat themselves up. This is wrong.

I am aware that I fall short of the glory of God and continually need His grace and forgiveness (Romans 3:23). However, 2 Corinthians 3:18 offers a new perspective that all of us can bring to Lent, the Word of God, and everything our Lord has given to lead us to spiritual maturity. It reminds us to seek God’s glory glowing more brightly in our lives, not merely a renewed battle against our sins.

When I look in a mirror, what do I see? In most mirrors, I see my own face. When I look in the spiritual mirror (the Bible), I often see my weaknesses and flaws. According to this passage, though, I should see something more. Not only should I see where I fail, but I should also see God’s glory in me: a glory that all of His children share.

Between Ash Wednesday and Easter, millions of Christians will unite in extra prayer, fasting, and self-examination. Let us not spend so much time counting our sins that we miss the greatest blessing of Lent: the realization that the glory of God already resides in us through His Holy Spirit; the fact that we are being transformed from glory to glory. Let us not view Lent as a time to cut down on a few sins or break a few bad habits. Let it be a time when we see more of God’s glory breaking forth in and through us.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

The Liebster Award

Thomas, from Motivation of Christian Love and Christenfindenruhe, has nominated my blog for the Liebster Award. It is an interesting prize that bloggers on WordPress have been awarding each other recently: We take the opportunity to acknowledge the blogs we read, and give each other an opportunity to share a little bit about what makes us tick. Danke schön, Thomas. (His post is available here.)

Here is the badge and the rules.

liebster-1-1

Here are the 10 questions he asked:

  1. Why did you start blogging? I mainly began blogging as a continuation or extension of my ministry, and especially as an outlet for my writing. I have always loved writing, and blogging gives me an opportunity to put my ideas out there.
  2. For how long have you been blogging? I’m not sure: I started blogging on WordPress in 2009, but I had one or two blogs on other sites before that. It might be 12 years or so.
  3. What are your hobbies other than blogging? I enjoy music and reading; I sing, play guitar and bass, and used to write a lot of songs. I also enjoy watching soccer.
  4. Is English your mother tongue? Yes. My mother was born in Germany, so I studied German for about seven years. I can still survive in a German conversation, although I may occasionally have to ask a native German speaker to “Sprechen Sie langsam, bitte.” (“Please speak slower.”) I also studied Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic in seminary, although I’m pretty rusty in all three. (I cannot speak any of them, but I can read biblical Greek. Hebrew and Aramaic are another story.)
  5. What are you writing about (on your blog)? “Darkened Glass Reflections” is devoted primarily to spiritual devotions, reflections about Scripture, and applying the Bible to daily life. Occasionally, I address current events from a biblical perspective. As part of Blogging 101, I signed up to participate in a “Sabbath Scripture Challenge” (writing a brief devotional every Sunday about a passage that spoke to my heart that week), and I am slowly working my way through a series about what we can learn from the life and ministry of Elijah: “Modern-Day Elijahs.” (You can find a link on my home page, under “Categories.”)
  6. How frequently are you posting? I have picked up the pace this year. I am posting about two times per week right now. In previous years, I would try to post “at least once per month,” and that would not happen. One lesson I have learned, and I share it with any new bloggers out there: You never will find time for anything; if you want time to blog, you must make it a priority.
  7. What is your favourite post? That is a difficult question. I think “Lent: A Time of Renewal” is up there among my favorites. I wrote it around Ash Wednesday 2011, and it’s probably the closest my blog ever got to “going viral.” It got around 150 hits within 24 hours. “Teaching, Reproof, Correction, and Training in Righteousness” (a commentary on 2 Timothy 3:16-17) has been my most popular post ever, with 1955 views since it was posted; its lasting success is a big reason why I like to focus on articles about prayer, Bible study, and other spiritual disciplines.
  8. How much time do you spend reading or viewing other blogs? I try to devote 15-30 minutes per evening. There are a lot of interesting posts out there; I wish I could devote more time.
  9. What other questions would you like to answer? Some of the other bloggers out there have asked some great questions. One I saw on others’ posts was “How did you come up with the name for your blog?” The title of “Darkened Glass Reflections” is inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:12, which reads “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.”
  10. What do you like or maybe dislike about the ‘Liebster Award’? I like the opportunity bloggers get to give other writers a little attention and respect. I have a feeling I will find it challenging to find 10 blogs, with less than 200 followers, who have not already been nominated.

Ten Random Facts about Me

  1. My favorite secular musicians are the Bee Gees and the Electric Light Orchestra. Yes, I am a child of the ’70s.
  2. My favorite Christian musicians include Petra, David Meece, Avalon, MercyMe, Daniel Amos, etc. I think my Christian musical tastes may be a lot broader than my secular tastes!
  3. C. S. Lewis is one of my favorite authors. I read Mere Christianity early in my Christian walk and it influenced my thinking more than any book, besides the Bible.
  4. I prefer the “Christian classics” to most modern Christian books. I will take The Imitation of Christ or The Practice of the Presence of God over almost anything on the current bestsellers list any day!
  5. I am a huge soccer fan.
  6. I attend a church that has an interesting mix of liturgical (almost Catholic) worship, with a blend of evangelical and charismatic elements. I like to think of myself as a “Christian in a blender.” (Our church likes to think of itself as “three streams” or “convergent.”)
  7. I am a notorious doughnut-junkie and caffeine addict. I have admitted that I am powerless over coffee and, if I don’t get it, everybody else’s life becomes unmanageable.
  8. I have a few ideas for books and hope to publish a full-fledged book one of these days.
  9. A few of my “Christian role models” from history include Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Saint Patrick. I find the real Saint Patrick to be even more fascinating than the myths and legends that have grown around him.
  10. Related to #9 and #10: I am part German and part Irish, and hope to visit both of my ancestral homelands one of these days.

My Ten Nominees:

I know it’s supposed to be blogs with less than 200 followers. However, I don’t follow a lot of blogs, and some have already been nominated. So, I may have to keep it below 1000 or something like that.

  1. Through Him, With Him, In Him
  2. Eurydice Howell
  3. My Paint Splattered Life
  4. Two Are Better Than One
  5. Daniel Abram
  6. Caffeine Epiphanies
  7. Take Me to Church

Sorry, I guess I could not come up with 10. Every WordPress blog I follow, besides these, has either already been nominated for a Liebster or is simply too big to consider nominating.

My Ten Questions:

I am going to ask the same ten questions Thomas asked me:

  1. Why did you start blogging?
  2. For how long have you been blogging?
  3. What  are your hobbies other than  blogging?
  4. Is English your mother tongue?
  5. What are you writing about (on your blog)?
  6. How frequently are you posting?
  7. What is your favourite post?
  8. How much time do you spend reading or viewing other blogs?
  9. What other questions would you like to answer?
  10. What do you like or maybe dislike about the ‘Liebster Award’?
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

%d bloggers like this: