Confession and Freedom—Proverbs 28:13

“Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy” (Proverbs 28:13, ESV).

In my previous post, I shared about the importance of confessing our sins one to another (James 5:16). Confession should not be taken lightly. Unfortunately, it is de-emphasized in many churches. Many feel that it seems too legalistic or “Catholic.” Furthermore, when one’s faith is self-focussed, emphasizing how well one is living the Christian life, acknowledging one’s sins is akin to admitting defeat and failure.

However, confession is the first step to freedom. Before we can live the victorious Christian life, we have to admit that we are failing. More importantly, we need to admit to God where and how we are failing. Then, He can guide us out of our darkness into the full experience of His light.

When I surrendered my life to Jesus Christ in 1984, I was told that I had to admit or confess that I am a sinner. Many of you probably heard a similar idea. However, this is only a half-truth. The Bible usually speaks of people confessing their sins, not merely admitting that they are sinners.

alessandro_allori_-_the_preaching_of_st_john_the_baptist_-_wga0183John the Baptist told his hearers to confess their sins. He did not tell them to admit that they are sinners.

For example, Matthew 3:6 tells us that people were confessing their sins to John the Baptist. Luke 3 gives specific examples of this: John gave specific counsel to some groups of people. In each case, it was obvious that “everybody else is doing it” was not an acceptable excuse for their sins. Even when it was considered a necessary evil of their jobs, if it was sin, they were supposed to repent.

Thus, true confession is not simply saying, “I am a sinner.” That is like saying, “Well, nobody’s perfect!” True confession is, “I did … and it was wrong. I thought or said … and I should not have. I did something that was not really bad in and of itself, but I did it for the wrong reasons. And, I do not blame anybody else. I did something I should not have done, and it is nobody else’s fault.” True confession is sincere, specific, and honest, and it accepts responsibility.

Do not let this discourage you, though. It sounds daunting, but it is actually a crucial step to experiencing spiritual liberty. When we confess our sins, we know those areas of our lives that require repentance. Without confession and repentance, our sins will hold us captive. With confession and repentance, we can seek the power of the Holy Spirit to give us victory over our sins and to experience inner peace and freedom. We can truly experience the mercy and forgiveness of God.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

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Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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