Posts Tagged With: confession

Honesty and Unity—Ephesians 4:25–27

“Therefore, having put away falsehood, let each one of you speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members one of another. Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and give no opportunity to the devil” (Ephesians 4:25–27).

ephesians-4-26-27.jpgIn December, I posted an article entitled “Renewed Mind and New Self—Ephesians 4:17–24.” This article follows up on that post, in part because the verses cited above immediately follow those. Furthermore, having your mind renewed by the Holy Spirit and the Word of God will not only empower you to live like the “new man” God says you are when you come to Christ: This leads to a transformation in your relationships with others.

Our relationships with other Christians should especially be affected. Jesus commands us to “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31). This should especially occur in our relationships with other Christians. Paul says each of us should “speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members one of another.” Whether we like it or not, we are united with other Christians, and this should affect how we live. Paul writes that we should be “eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (Ephesians 4:3).

This spiritual unity should guide our entire Christian walk. We do not go to church: We are the church. We are members of the body of Christ and, as such, members of one another. If I attack or abuse my brother or sister in Christ, I attack or abuse Jesus and, in the process, I abuse myself.

Many evangelical Christians speak of having “a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.” However, while the relationship is personal, it is not individualistic. It is a familial relationship. My relationship with Christ unites me with other people who are part of the family of God, the same way other family relationships unite us with others.

This relationship with Christ demands us to love our brothers and sisters in Christ as much as we love ourselves, because God is love. It also calls us to live honestly and truthfully with other Christians, because Jesus is the Truth.

This does not mean we must admit every sin and struggle to every other person in the church. Unfortunately, none of us is perfect, and some believers can be terribly critical or judgmental, and may be horrible gossips. However, we should be honest with ourselves, with God, and with others: Particularly, we should not deceive anybody, and we should find those mature brothers and sisters with whom we can be completely honest. James 5:16 says, “Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working.”

james-5-16

In some churches, you may be able to go to a member of the clergy for sacramental confession. The priest or minister is required to hear your confession, remind you of Christ’s forgiveness, and never mention your sin again. They should model forgiveness, so that you may be empowered to live a holy life.

If your church does not have sacramental confession, find a mature believer whom you can trust: Someone who will listen to you without demeaning or judging you, who will remind you that you are forgiven, and who will guard your darkest secrets as if they are his own.

We should be honest about our emotions and our conflicts as well. “Be angry and do not sin” does not mean we should look for opportunities to get ticked off. Rather, it means we will get angry eventually. People will say or do things that hurt our feelings. However, that does not mean we should act out sinfully to resolve a situation. We should not bottle up our feelings. However, when we express our anger, we should do it in such a way that we work toward restoration of the relationship as quickly as we can. Do not give the devil an opportunity to inspired bitterness, grudges, hostility, or conflict within the church, the family, or the social circle. Speak up, speak honestly, speak the truth in love, and allow the God of truth to work in your life and heart.

Christian unity is not based on our feelings. It is a supernatural result of our unity with Christ. Because we are members of His body, we are united with other believers. Because of this, love and sincerity should characterize our relationships one with another.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Renewing the Mind Reflections | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Confession and Freedom—Proverbs 28:13

“Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy” (Proverbs 28:13, ESV).

In my previous post, I shared about the importance of confessing our sins one to another (James 5:16). Confession should not be taken lightly. Unfortunately, it is de-emphasized in many churches. Many feel that it seems too legalistic or “Catholic.” Furthermore, when one’s faith is self-focussed, emphasizing how well one is living the Christian life, acknowledging one’s sins is akin to admitting defeat and failure.

However, confession is the first step to freedom. Before we can live the victorious Christian life, we have to admit that we are failing. More importantly, we need to admit to God where and how we are failing. Then, He can guide us out of our darkness into the full experience of His light.

When I surrendered my life to Jesus Christ in 1984, I was told that I had to admit or confess that I am a sinner. Many of you probably heard a similar idea. However, this is only a half-truth. The Bible usually speaks of people confessing their sins, not merely admitting that they are sinners.

alessandro_allori_-_the_preaching_of_st_john_the_baptist_-_wga0183John the Baptist told his hearers to confess their sins. He did not tell them to admit that they are sinners.

For example, Matthew 3:6 tells us that people were confessing their sins to John the Baptist. Luke 3 gives specific examples of this: John gave specific counsel to some groups of people. In each case, it was obvious that “everybody else is doing it” was not an acceptable excuse for their sins. Even when it was considered a necessary evil of their jobs, if it was sin, they were supposed to repent.

Thus, true confession is not simply saying, “I am a sinner.” That is like saying, “Well, nobody’s perfect!” True confession is, “I did … and it was wrong. I thought or said … and I should not have. I did something that was not really bad in and of itself, but I did it for the wrong reasons. And, I do not blame anybody else. I did something I should not have done, and it is nobody else’s fault.” True confession is sincere, specific, and honest, and it accepts responsibility.

Do not let this discourage you, though. It sounds daunting, but it is actually a crucial step to experiencing spiritual liberty. When we confess our sins, we know those areas of our lives that require repentance. Without confession and repentance, our sins will hold us captive. With confession and repentance, we can seek the power of the Holy Spirit to give us victory over our sins and to experience inner peace and freedom. We can truly experience the mercy and forgiveness of God.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Confession and Deliverance—James 5:16

“Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working.” (James 5:16, ESV)

james-5-16Over the next few weeks and months, I hope to reflect on a series of verses from the study guide of a Bible study my church’s men’s ministry is following [A Man and His Traps, Volume 3 of 33 The Series, published by Authentic Manhood/LifeWay Church Resources (2013), pp. 56–59 of the study guide]. The series focuses on the idols that lead men into temptation. The verses provide ammunition for renewal of the mind (Romans 12:1–2) to transform our perspective from a worldly attitude of defeat to Christ-centered victory. The study participants are urged to meditate on these Scriptures, memorize them, and gain a new perspective as a result.

Personally, I find that writing and study are a great way to assist myself in this process: A blog post challenges me to think thoroughly about a passage, and the feedback and other responses that follow (comments, readers clicking “like,” and so on) allow me to come back and think some more throughout the days that follow.

Although inspired by a men’s study, the reflections should help women as well. In Christ there is neither male nor female (Galatians 3:28), and although we may struggle with different temptations, we share access to the same spiritual blessings.

With that preface in mind, let us reflect on James 5:16.

Many Christians are uncomfortable with confession. Some will say that it sounds too “Catholic” and therefore should be avoided as a form of legalism. Others say it is unnecessary: Since we are forgiven, why should we even think about our sins? Isn’t this just heaping condemnation upon ourselves?

Perhaps these arguments are merely excuses. The verse above is clear. It is a command: “confess your sins” is not preceded or followed by “if you wish” or “you might want to try this sometime.” James also commands us to confess your sins to one another. Some people are not afraid to confess their sins to God, but they do not want another person to hear it. Those who claim to be Bible-believing Christians should not avoid a command of Scripture merely because another denomination emphasizes it more, or it is uncomfortable.

The root of this perspective is pride. We like to pretend that we are better than we really are, and we do not want others to think we are imperfect. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, in his classic Life Together, proposed that when someone is uncomfortable confessing his sins to another person and only confesses privately to God, he is merely confessing to himself and granting himself absolution: “Who can give us the certainty that, in the confession and the forgiveness of our sins, we are not dealing with ourselves but with the living God? God gives us this certainty through our brother. Our brother breaks the circle of self-deception. A man who confesses his sins in the presence of a brother knows that he is no longer alone with himself; he experiences the presence of God in the reality of the other person.

It is important that we find someone through whom we can experience the presence of God. Twelve Step programs like Alcoholic Anonymous urge their members to take a personal moral inventory and then admit the exact nature of their wrongs to themselves, God, and another human being. That other person should just listen: They should not judge or condemn; they should quietly listen, without interrupting to interject advice or ask questions. Most importantly, they will not tell anybody what you have said: Your admitted failings should be a secret shared by the two of you and God alone. Through that time of listening, the person who is making confession can find healing by unloading their spiritual garbage.

So, if you are struggling, you may want to consider some kind of confession. Take some time first to reflect on your life and note the areas where you have failed: Twelve-Step programs frequently have excellent resources to help you with this. Then, find a trustworthy confidante. If you attend a church that offers formal sacramental confession, you may speak to the pastor; if not, find a trusted mature believer, one with whom you have a close relationship and who you know will never gossip about you.

If you are asked to hear such a confession: Sit back, listen, and do not say anything. Maybe, after the person has completed their confession, you may offer some guidance, if you feel the Holy Spirit has revealed anything to you or you have successfully overcome one of the person’s besetting sins. Most importantly, do not judge or belittle the person.

Finally, pray for one another. When one believer has admitted his sins to another, they should pray for deliverance and for the power to resist temptation. Confession is the first step to repentance, restoration, and deliverance. Your prayers are the greatest tool you have to bring this to fruition.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Renewing the Mind Reflections | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—Luke 18:9–14

And He also told this parable to some people who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and viewed others with contempt:Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and was praying this to himself: “God, I thank You that I am not like other people: swindlers, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I pay tithes of all that I get.” But the tax collector, standing some distance away, was even unwilling to lift up his eyes to heaven, but was beating his breast, saying, “God, be merciful to me, the sinner!” I tell you, this man went to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted.’” (Luke 18:9–14, NASB)

The prayer of the Pharisee is more common than most of us are willing to admit. I have said it a few times. That is not easy to admit. We Christians have learned over the years that, when you see the Pharisees in the Gospels, you know they are the “bad guys.” Therefore, whatever they are doing must be wrong.

However, there is a sense in which the Pharisee’s prayer makes a lot of sense. Everything that he says about himself is Scriptural. God does not want us to be swindlers, unjust, adulterers, or crooked. Fasting and tithing are noble activities, commended and commanded elsewhere in Scripture (even in the New Testament). In fact, if you can make the Pharisee’s bold claims, you should thank God (as he does).

So, what is wrong with his prayer? Why does Jesus say that the tax collector went home justified, but not the Pharisee? We could stop by simply saying “he exalted himself,” but what does that mean? The Pharisee’s prayer was flawed on several counts.

For one, he made other people his standard of righteousness. “I thank You that I am not like other people…or even this tax collector.” Romans 3:23 tell us that all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, not the glory of another person. We can all find another person who is worse than us in some way. “I have killed less people than Hitler” is not exactly a reason to brag.

The Pharisee assumed the worst about the tax collector. Granted, first-century Jewish tax collectors often earned their bad reputation due to corruption and greed. However, the Pharisee could not see what went through the other man’s heart. For some reason, the tax collector was begging for God’s mercy. His life and conscience were troubling him. Why had he chosen this career? What temptations did he find irresistible once employed by Rome? How many corrupt things had he done, which he had initially promised himself he would avoid? Maybe other questions like these kept him awake at night. The tax collector knew his own heart, and so did God. Perhaps all of us bear some shame or regret known only to ourselves. Other people may know the rumors, and maybe they know the facts. They may not know why you have followed a certain path in life, or made some of your choices.

However, the Pharisee’s greatest mistake was that he did not search his own heart to find out where cleansing was necessary. We ought regularly pray, as the psalmist did, “Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me and know my anxious thoughts; and see if there be any hurtful way in me, And lead me in the everlasting way” (Psalm 139:23–24). The Pharisee knew what he was doing right. What was he doing wrong, though? Maybe his sins were not as obvious as the tax collector’s. Sinful attitudes, including pride, greed, and hatred, can cause as much damage as sinful actions. It is easy for us to condemn the sins that do not ensnare us. Unfortunately, it is even easier to make excuses for our own mistakes, to make it sound like our sins are somehow acceptable. At the very least, we often pretend our sins are not as bad as those committed by the other guy.

May we always ask the Holy Spirit to reveal our own sin to us. He can work in our hearts as well as the hearts of others. However, we have to open our hearts to Him. May He do His perfect work in our hearts, as we trust Him to deal with other people’s hearts in His own time.

This post was written as part of the Scripture Sabbath Challenge.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Character and Values, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Set Free

“So Jesus said to the Jews who had believed him, ‘If you abide in my word, you are truly my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free’” (John 8:31-32, ESV).

Jesus never promised the sort of freedom that modern Americans demand. We demand the right to do whatever we want. We demand the right to have sex without commitment, to place personal convenience over obligation or the needs of others. But, this is not the freedom Jesus offered; in fact, Jesus would have considered it a form of slavery.

Jesus did not promise freedom from political oppression. His original disciples worshiped Him and evangelized within the Roman Empire. Today, millions of Christians serve Him in countries where their faith is illegal.

The freedom Jesus offered was freedom from sin. In John 8:34-36, He said, ““Truly, truly, I say to you, everyone who practices sin is a slave to sin. The slave does not remain in the house forever; the son remains forever. So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed.”

Unfortunately, many people (even Christians) do not receive this freedom. Jesus was speaking to “Jews who had believed him” (verse 31). They were on the  brink of following Him, but they missed out because they could not accept the need for freedom. Their response to Jesus’ offer of freedom was, “We are offspring of Abraham and have never been enslaved to anyone. How is it that you say, ‘You will become free’?” (John 8:33).

Had they read their Bibles? Did they not realize that the “offspring of Abraham” had been slaves in Egypt for 400 years; that they had spent 70 years in exile in Babylon; that periods of slavery and oppression dominated much of their history? Did they not even realize that they were now under the dominion of a foreign empire? It was not unusual for Jews to consider themselves slaves to the Roman Empire.

Jesus’ hearers suffered from the malady of denial. When confronted with the fact that we are in spiritual bondage, we lie to ourselves, God, and other people. “We are not really sinning; we love each other and nobody is getting hurt.” “I can stop doing this any time I want.” “It’s not my fault; my spouse/children/boss/others drive me to drink. They need to change, not me.”

Jesus’ listeners rejected His offer of forgiveness. They assumed it was not for them. They convinced themselves that they had no need to be set free. When pressed on the matter, they decided Jesus had a problem, but they were OK. Unfortunately, many of us repeat that pattern.

To experience true freedom, we need to first admit that we are in bondage. We have to acknowledge that sin has gained control over our lives. Once we admit that we are bound by the chains of sin, we will be ready for release. When confronted by our sins, we do not need to make excuses; we need only make confession and ask Jesus to forgive and cleanse us.

If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

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